Pepsi Cola

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Pepsi Cola

Pepsi-Cola, advertised as the “Taste Born in the Carolinas,” is one of many carbonated soft drinks invented in the South between the Civil War and World War I, when the temperance movement, poverty, and the relatively high prices of coffee and tea conspired with the climate to create a regional market for inexpensive, nonalcoholic social beverages. Caleb Bradham (1867-1934) first concocted Pepsi-Cola as a fountain drink at a pharmacy at Pollock and Middle Streets in New Bern in 1893. Three years later he formally gave “Brad’s Drink” a new name-Pepsin Cola. He began bottling and marketing Pepsi under its present name in 1898 and founded the Pepsi-Cola Company in 1903. By World War I Pepsi was sold in 24 states. During the war, Bradham invested heavily in sugar in order to ensure a reliable supply, and the glut of 1920 abruptly ended his prosperity and his ownership of the company. Pepsi-Cola changed hands repeatedly over the next decade, but bottlers who had large stocks of syrup kept some Pepsi drinkers satisfied without interruption.

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