Oils

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    Corn Oil

    Corn oil is oil extracted from the germ of corn. Its main use is in cooking, where its high smoke point makes refined corn oil a valuable frying oil. It is also a key ingredient in some margarines. Corn oil is generally less expensive than most other types of vegetable oils.

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    Cotton Seed Oil

    Cottonseed oil is a cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plants of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium herbaceum, that are grown for cotton fiber, animal feed, and oil.

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    Cumin Seed Oil

    Nigella sativa is a small flowering shrub with purple or white-tinged flowers that grows in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and western Asia.

    While it may look unsuspecting, the shrub produces fruits that have tiny black seeds. These black seeds have been used in remedies for thousands of years.

    Archaeologists even found black seeds in King Tut’s tomb, emphasizing their importance in history for healing and protection. They’re also used in cooking to add flavor to breads, curries, and pickles. When eaten, the seeds have a bitter flavor that’s often compared to cumin or oregano.

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    Fax Seed Oil

    Linseed oil, also known as flaxseed oil or flax oil, is a colourless to yellowish oil obtained from the dried, ripened seeds of the flax plant. The oil is obtained by pressing, sometimes followed by solvent extraction. Linseed oil is a drying oil, meaning it can polymerize into a solid form.

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    Hazelnut Oil

    Hazelnut oil is liquid extracted from a hazelnut by a machine called a press. It’s commonly used for cooking and in salad dressings. It’s also used for hair care and as a carrier oil for aromatherapy or massage oils.

    But hazelnut oil can also be used as a skin care product. It’s loaded with skin-nourishing vitamins and essential fatty acids that help protect skin against sun damage, boost collagen production, and more.

    Keep reading to learn more about how hazelnut can benefit your skin and how to add it to your skincare routine.

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    Mustard Oil

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    Olive Oil

    Olive oil is a fat obtained from the fruit of the Olea europaea (olive tree), a traditional tree crop of the Mediterranean region. Whole olives are pressed to produce this distinctive oil.

    The oil is used in cosmetics, medicine, cooking, and soaps, and was also used as a fuel for traditional lamps. Olive oil originally came from the Mediterranean, but today it is used worldwide.

    In the diet, olives can be eaten whole or chopped and added to pizzas and other dishes.

    The oil can be used as a dip for bread, for frying, or as a salad dressing. Some people even consume it by the small glassful for medicinal purposes.

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    Palm Oil

    Palm oil is a type of edible vegetable oil that is derived from the palm fruit, grown on the African oil palm tree. Oil palms are originally from Western Africa, but can flourish wherever heat and rainfall are abundant. Today, palm oil is grown throughout Africa, Asia, North America, and South America, with 85% of all palm oil globally produced and exported from Indonesia and Malaysia; but most of the time not using sustainable measures.

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    Peanut Oil

    Peanut oil, also referred to as groundnut oil or arachis oil, is a vegetable-derived oil made from the edible seeds of the peanut plant.

    Though the peanut plant flowers above ground, the seeds or peanuts actually develop underground. This is why peanuts are also known as groundnuts.

    Peanuts are often grouped with tree nuts like walnuts and almonds, but they are actually a type of legume that belongs to the pea and bean family.

    Depending on processing, peanut oil can have a wide range of flavors that vary from mild and sweet to strong and nutty.

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    Rapeseed Oil

    Rapeseed, also known as rape, oil seed rape, is a bright-yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae, cultivated mainly for its oil-rich seed. It is the third-largest source of vegetable oil in the world.

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    Rice Bran Oil

    A good cooking oil doesn’t just add life to the most common foods, but also plays a pivotal role in your health. It could affect your cholesterol levels, alter your metabolic syndrome and if you’re using the right kind of oil, it could also reduce inflammation. That’s what makes it all the more important to pick the right one. In the last few years, ghee (clarified butter) and refined oil have earned a bad reputation due to the cholesterol and heart disease scare. For such health reasons, people have become more open to experiment with new types of oil. On such variety that has slowly been creeping up on health charts is Rice Bran Oil.

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    Safflower Oil

    Safflower oil is a popular cooking oil made from the seeds of the safflower plant. Some research suggests it may have some health benefits when used in the diet and on the skin.

    Safflower oil may be a more healthful option than olive oil when cooking at high temperatures, thanks to its high smoke point and neutral flavor.

    In this article, we list the top health benefits of safflower oil. We also discuss the effects of safflower oil for weight loss.